Osaka

I collapsed into the bed at the hotel and relaxed for just a moment. It had been five years since I last set foot in Osaka.

A light rain was falling outside my window, the beginning of autumn, the beginning of an adventure. The place was in Bentencho, in the south-west. I grabbed my gear and followed the path under a covered shopping street and under a rail bridge. A group of kids passed me by on their bicycles, I asked them where the old town was, they said to go north. I wandered past the ominous form of the Kyocera Dome and followed the rivers and canals. I was walking past streets and houses that would only be a memory in Tokyo…

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Tokyo

The title of his series, DERIVE, means to ‘drift through the city’. Cody spends a lot of time wandering and exploring the aging skyscrapers and cityscapes of Tokyo.

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Cody Ellingham
Akan: Lost World

Akan is located in the farthest reaches of Hokkaido, in the North of Japan. The photo series explores the lakes and mountains of the area. Though the subject matter is different from his previous work, Cody sees a deep connection between his home country, New Zealand, and Akan.

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Cody Ellingham
Shanghai Streets

On the edge of a rooftop, overlooking the old colonial architecture of yesteryear, his images peer through time and place at the impossible glass and steel rising up through the red mist of a belligerent summer thunderstorm.

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Cody Ellingham
Taiwan

The summer typhoon missed us, but the heat still hit the mark. A black dog walks into the convenience store behind me and follows me for the rest of the evening, my first ally in this beautifully vibrant city.

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Cody Ellingham
Danchi Dreams

An exploration of space and time, through the topic of Modern Japanese Public Housing architecture.
The dream of modernity, of cities rebuilt, has been forgotten. All that is left is concrete.

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Cody Ellingham
Onepoto

The structures of the land appear to be static and unchanging, but to the land itself they are temporal and in constant motion. The glyphs were carved by an ancestor of one of us and are part of the story of the land. However our conception of time is fundamentally scaled to the human lifespan.

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Cody Ellingham